Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are

Good insight for that speech/interview/presentation.  Strike a pose:

Body language affects how others see us, but it may also change how we see ourselves. Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how “power posing” — standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success.

Amy Cuddy’s research on body language reveals that we can change other people’s perceptions — and even our own body chemistry — simply by changing body positions

via Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are | Video on TED.com.

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One thought on “Amy Cuddy: Your body language shapes who you are

  1. clarkanne12 says:

    This is probably one of my favorite TED talks. The idea of changing how you stand affecting how people react around you is such a novel idea. I talk to people every day about how they are adjusting to college life. How they react to me is all dependent on how I sit, talk and listen. If I am slouching and looking away from them periodically they realize I’m not listening. But if I am upright, looking them in the eye and asking pertinent questions they instantly respond in a positive way. It’s important to realize that when talking to someone, especially someone like a boss or a diplomat, you have to have the appropriate body language. People want to know you are interested in their life and what they have to say. You can also effectively get this message across in a presentation. As a former debater we constantly worked on our “blocking,” or body movement, so the judge would pay attention and respond well. As a diplomat, as a person, as someone who needs to explain their message, you HAVE to understand these rules. I also think this is especially pertinent in a different country where you aren’t sure of the social rules. Adjusting your body language is probably the best way to have them respond positively.

    Question: Do diplomats take body language “classes?” How effective would that be?

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