European Union Budget Talks Collapse – NYTimes.com

Another failure to negotiate in Europe:

The impasse after two days of negotiations was the second failure this week in Brussels. European finance ministers met all night on Monday without reaching agreement on whether to release the next round of emergency aid to Greece, where unemployment is around 25 percent.

Herman Van Rompuy, the president of the European Council, which represents the leaders of European Union member states, convened the summit meeting and called off the negotiations rather than prolonging them through the weekend. He said that the European Union’s budget “has to be balanced and well prepared, not in the mood of improvisation, because we are touching upon jobs, we are touching upon sensitive issues.”

“We should be able to bridge existing divergences” in the new year, Mr. Van Rompuy said.

via European Union Budget Talks Collapse – NYTimes.com.

Advertisements
Tagged , ,

2 thoughts on “European Union Budget Talks Collapse – NYTimes.com

  1. It’s interesting to see the parallels between the EU and the US. America is approaching the “fiscal cliff,” as we’ve fondly named it, and the EU is approaching its own debt disaster. The US has recently seen a marked rise in calls for secession, although most denounce that movement as insignificant in the long-term. The EU is dealing with its own threats of disintegration, which would seriously jeopardize the union’s future (http://www.cnbc.com/id/49946255). As the US goes, so goes the EU, and vice versa. If either group fails to resolve its financial crisis, the other will suffer significantly. But the US has much more in common with Britain than it does with the rest of Europe. So no matter what Britain does, the US is sure to reassuringly pat its closest ally on the back (even if Americans quietly disagree with Britain’s choice). The US would likely be making the same arguments if it were in Britain’s position right now. At the end of the day, I think America’s loyalty goes first and foremost to the British, meaning any failure on the EU’s part to keep David Cameron happy will ensure a “Brixit”, permanently handicap the EU, and further damage the US. At this point, Americans need to hope the EU stays together, while simultaneously hoping Congress can avoid the fiscal cliff.

  2. Sara Gomez says:

    It is difficult to get to a consensus in the European Union because there are so many interests and what needs to be done does not favor everyone. For example, José Manuel Barroso said they want efficiency gains in terms of reducing costs that can be avoidable, but no cutting the capacity of the European institutions to act referring to the agricultural policy. Britain has a different perspective but with the crisis a cut in stuff is probably is a really good idea. Many countries are characterized by a big bureaucracy and the problem with this is that the bigger the less efficient the bureaucracy. Although the European Union is a complete different case is possible that by decreasing the number of stuff in the bureaucracy the efficiency remains constant and costs decreases. It would be necessary for them to get a consensus regarding the European Budget and Britain would have to collaborate by taking other ideas into account.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2237178/Cameron-rounds-EU-leaders-quaffed-120-bottles-wine-lunch-insisting-room-make-savings-Brussels-budget.html

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: