Iran’s Political Infighting Erupts in Full View – NYTimes.com

Lest you think of Iran’s political system monolithically, consider this:

The accusation escalated a simmering conflict between Mr. Ahmadinejad and opponents among influential clerics, parliamentarians and commanders. It followed a decision announced on Sunday by Iran’s judiciary to deny Mr. Ahmadinejad access to the prison — a humiliating slap at the president’s authority.

via Iran’s Political Infighting Erupts in Full View – NYTimes.com.

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One thought on “Iran’s Political Infighting Erupts in Full View – NYTimes.com

  1. emilylheath says:

    The political situation in Iran is really interesting and really confusing. Despite Iran’s presidential system, the Supreme Leader really holds the cards as far as determining Iran’s policies. The Supreme Leader is able to play such a powerful role due to his backing by the elite ulama clergy and the Iranian citizens. The ulama may hold political positions, but even without a politically powerful role the ulama often have more power than political leaders. This lack of centralized power by the Iranian government stems from the theocratic ideas of Islam.

    Surprisingly, the younger, more educated generation of Iranians are turning even more to traditional Islamic beliefs. This new generation has boosted the power of Islam in Iran by supporting the clergy’s right to govern and by supporting Sharia law. The lack of presidential power, as seen in the article mentioned above, is not unexpected when viewed under the light of Islam. Islam is a way of life in Iran, and, according to Islamic belief, only the educated ulama clergy have the right to interpret and expound on Islamic law. Islam is a mutable religion, but political leaders do not retain the right to change it, leading to an inherent limit in their power.

    The following website highlights the origination of the ulama:
    http://fis-iran.org/en/irannameh/volxv/ulama-authority

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