Berlusconi Sentenced to Four Years for Tax Fraud – NYTimes.com

A show of strength for Italian justice:

The symbolism of ruling — a clear blow against Mr. Berlusconi — also comes at a time when his center-right party is unraveling and Italy is in the throes of the most dramatic political transition since the one in the early 1990s in which he first came to power.

via Berlusconi Sentenced to Four Years for Tax Fraud – NYTimes.com.

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5 thoughts on “Berlusconi Sentenced to Four Years for Tax Fraud – NYTimes.com

  1. ayoungkang says:

    I applaud Italian justice for exercising its legal strength and establishing a rule of law that will further strengthen citizenship of Italians. It was extemely disappointing when I read a news article (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/30/business/global/30samsung.html) that the Korean Supreme Court’s ruling against the former CEO of Samsung, convicted of embezzlement and tax evasion, was pardoned by President Lee in the name of “national interest,” that is, “incarcerating him would disrupt the economy.” This blatant injustice directly tranlates to citizen’s disappointment and distrust towards the government and take corruption as a given in rules of games, and thereby destroys the sense of rule of law in a country.

  2. Leah Copeland says:

    The Italian judicial system is doing all they can to stand for justice, regardless of who they are taking action against. It is unfortunate that “It is unlikely that he will ever serve jail time.” I initially believed that it was unfair that Berlusconi would not serve time, but in other news it is apparent that he is paying the price for his misdeeds in other ways. HIs party has immediately lost the support they once had and Italy is on the verge of electing someone from the left. It is apparent that Italy will soon undergo many political changes because of the shift in support. It is amazing how fraud committed in the past by one person in leadership has and will affect the entire nation of Italy.

    The following article was just published and offers the most recent view on the political affects this trial will have:
    http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/29/italy-politics-idUSL5E8LT7WU20121029

  3. Hannah Barton says:

    If I may say so, this makes me feel so relieved for Italy. the blow that comes with this verdict, even if it isn’t upheld, will likely keep Berlusconi from ever being elected again. The man has brought so much corruption into the Italian government. Berlusconi owns almost all of the media in Italy, which has given him complete control of what the people watch. He is know for sex scandal and supposed mafia collusion, which, if true, may very well be part of the reason there is so much corruption in the south of Italy, so much mafia involvement in the government that they can’t even finish construction on a road (http://www.nytimes.com/2012/10/08/world/europe/in-italy-calabria-is-drained-by-corruption.html?pagewanted=all) With Berlusconi unable to obtain office again, I hope that Italy may make better choices in their government, and choose more men like the current (non-elected) Prime Minister Mario Monti. The elections next spring will be really interesting to watch.

  4. cpesci says:

    I have pretty strong ties to Italy. I have spoken to many people over the years about their feelings toward Berlusconi as a leader, and as a human being. I never once heard good things (though he has done many things to make Italy a technologically relevant country). This could be due to the fact that I spent the majority of my time in Southern Italy, a place that is behind its northern counterpart (Berlusconi is unanimous with Milan, Italy’s northern capital of industrialization) when it comes to industrialization and modernization. Berlusconi is the face of Italian TV, soccer, and other various commodities, including milk. He has been involved in many allegations of tax fraud and evasion, as well as other issues dealing with his moral character. I don’t see this sentence as having much of an impact on a man with money like him, as he will most likely not serve any jail time. He will still make money off his television stations (Mediaset), his soccer team (AC Milan) and his other companies. There is much speculation amongst citizens pertaining to the corruptibility of Italian politicians, especially in a place where organized crime is reality, not just a Francis Ford Coppola trilogy. If he is involved, an allegation made more than once, he will almost never face serious penalization as he should.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/italy/9638099/Berlusconi-down-and-humiliated-but-not-out-of-Italian-politics.html

  5. ctrmathias says:

    Before we get too excited over this, it is important to note that the punishment was immediately reduced to 1 year and that an appeal was lodged, which seems likely to go in Berlusconi’s favor. He is still one of the most powerful men in the world with his wealth, and will likely go free. Italy’s legal system likely still has a long ways to go.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-20028295

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