U.S. Tracking Killers in Attack on Libya Mission – NYTimes.com

Great details from the ground in Libya that resembles CSI: Middle East–but with sovereignty dimensions that complicate every aspect:

The preparations underscore the bind confronting the White House over the Benghazi attack. Mr. Obama has vowed to bring the killers to justice, and in the final weeks of the presidential campaign Republicans have hammered the administration over the possible intelligence failures that preceded the attack — including a new accusation that repeated requests for strengthened security in Benghazi had been rejected.

But any American military action on Libyan soil would risk casualties and almost certainly set off a popular backlash at a moment when support for the revolt against Col. Muammar el-Qaddafi had created a surge in good feeling toward the United States that is unique in the region.

via U.S. Tracking Killers in Attack on Libya Mission – NYTimes.com.

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One thought on “U.S. Tracking Killers in Attack on Libya Mission – NYTimes.com

  1. I am surprised that nobody has as yet commented on this particular article. Here’s my take:

    Extremists within Benghazi want to create an Islamic, totalitarian regime similar to Iran in Libya. In order to do this, they must first eliminate those outside actors who are currently trying to foster a stable democracy. Since April of this year, Islamic extremists have attacked a number of organizations which support democracy, including the Red Cross offices, UN and British envoys, and the same American consulate which has now been destroyed. (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-18401792)

    Based on which groups were targeted, I say the attackers want to terrorize pro-democratic groups into withdrawing from Libya, presumably so that Islamic extremists could then influence the new Libyan government at their will. The most recent attack, which killed an American ambassador for the first time in over 30 years, demonstrates the following: 1.) the attackers want the Westerners to leave town, 2.) They have the forces necessary to impose their will on others, and 3.) they do not fear prosecution or retribution from Libya, the international community, or anyone else.

    I think our response so far has been too little, too late, though I sincerely wish the FBI and all those supporting them success in catching the perpetrators. I would recommend the following:

    1. Respect Libyan sovereignty by explaining that due to the nature of the situation, we need to send American Special Forces into Benghazi to secure the former consulate and eliminate the militants who present a clear and present danger to both Libyan sovereignty and our own national security.

    2. Increase foreign aid to expand the Libyan national army quickly to establish federal control over the country

    3. Have friendly militias, as defined by the local government, integrate into the national army and disband/disarm all other militias, by force if necessary.

    4. Establish a UN peacekeeping mission to assist in providing local security in the more lawless portions of Libya, which I realize is most of the country.

    If we fail to act now, we run the risk of permitting the creation of a safe haven for terrorists in Libya where they can gather, train, and stage attacks against Americans and those sympathetic to our cause. On the other hand, if we act decisively, we can help the Libyan people themselves create a stable democracy in an unstable region of the world, a nation which will then stand as a beacon of hope to the Islamic world for peace.

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