Spike in Police Officer Deaths Alarms São Paulo – NYTimes.com

Not a good sign with the World Cup and Olympics heading to Brazil–and a sign of things to come, with increased urbanization [.doc download]  being a dominant future trend:

“We’re witnessing a low-intensity war unfold between police units and Brazil’s most powerful criminal organization,” said Camila Nunes Dias, a sociologist who specializes in the P.C.C. at the University of São Paulo’s Center for Violence Studies. “The retaliatory nature of this conflict shows that it can endure for some time to come.”

via Spike in Police Officer Deaths Alarms São Paulo – NYTimes.com.

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6 thoughts on “Spike in Police Officer Deaths Alarms São Paulo – NYTimes.com

  1. katiaroque says:

    The penitentiary system is Brazil is awful and highly inefficient. We like to say that our reformatory system takes in “chicken robbers”, and return back to society fully formed killers and thieves. It is a great university for criminality. There are no rich or middle class residents in the regular prison system, and those who are forced to share a cell with so many other criminals, learn pretty fast that the law inside prison walls in Brazil is to kill or get killed. However, the absence of respect both from inmates and the police force is not new or specific to the penitentiary system.
    Brazilian lower classes know from a very young age that they will not have great chances in life, the police are not to be trusted, and their best shot in life is to join the many drug trafficking organizations spread throughout the slums, where the enemy, or government forces, has limited access. Brazilian police is extremely violent and corrupt.
    When traveling through the interior of Bahia, a police “blitz” asked me to stop, and after not being able to find anything wrong with my car, the policeman pointed out that the fire extinguisher was located on the wrong side of the car, which is a feature that comes with that specific vehile. Since there was nothing I could do about it, I insisted that that it was not my fault, and that he should let me go. The policemen kept asking for “beer money” and my husband and I pretended we did not understand. He finally got very upset and sent us on our way.
    I am not defending the men who took the police officer’s life this week, but what happened in Carandiru over 20 years ago, still happens today in smaller, but constant doses. Criminality in Brazil will only slow down when we see a real effort by the part of local governments to end corruption from inside out.
    The follow link explains what happened in Carandiru, a penitenciary in Sao Paulo, where many inmates were killed by the police after an uprising.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-19806711

  2. I do not agree with the policies employed by some of the special units of the Sao Paulo police force. (I’m not entirely sure if most police in Sao Paulo also usually shoot first and ask questions later) I believe that the police units that shoot on sight or torture are entirely out of line with how a police force should operate. I recognize the critical need to most cautiously handle certain situations with drugs trafficers in Sao Paulo and that interactions with trafficers is extremely dangerous for the police officers, but until they start stop ruthlessly killing and torturing, the revenge killings will continue. It was cruel and unjust police brutality that helped further encourage increased establishment of the PCC in the first place. Further abuse of police power will not help the situation.

  3. The above link refers to the police brutality performed ten years ago on a Sao Paulo penitentiary

  4. marianorfila says:

    In addition to everything that is being said, there other reasons why there is a increase in such violence. According to the report, http://riotimesonline.com/brazil-news/rio-politics/wave-of-crime-in-sao-paulo/, also explained the rising property crimes were a result of Brazilian’s wealth increasing, making home robberies more profitable. Organized crime was largely responsible for vehicle robberies and thefts. “This is not something new, but has intensified because it is very profitable. This affects even the insurance industry,” told Folha. Such issues has also affected the states elections that are happening right now in Brazil. Candidates had to change and add to their agenda such issues and how to solve them.

  5. mitchmender says:

    This is an alarming article that you cant read without wondering what will happen in the future especially with the Olympics and world cup coming up but i think that this small war between police and these gangs will not effect these events. after serving my mission and returning late as a student i have come to realize that the violence is often targeted and specific. very often in order to get revenge for some act of violence or another, As i citizen i have always felt very safe in some of the “rougher” neighborhoods of Brazil. I do think the alarming rates of death demands our respect and attention. Even though there are many “elite” groups of officers in training the question is what type of training they are receiving and is it enough?

    http://www.icrc.org/eng/resources/documents/misc/57jqwk.htm

    this is a short article that refers to some training given to a small group of police officers on human rights.

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